800x800-Tosca

Puccini’s Tosca

Italy’s Greatest Diva… Torture, Murder, Suicide. A Masterpiece of Corruption and Intrigue

Saturday, April 30, 2016 (rain or shine)
Act 1: 2:00 – 2:45 pm or Act 1: 3:45 – 4:30 pm
at Church Street United Methodist Church. Due to the church’s limited seating, patrons need to choose between the two performances of this act.
Act 2: 7:30 – 8:20 pm
Knoxville Convention Exhibition Center
Act 3: 9:20 – 9:50 pm
World’s Fair Park Amphitheater

Knoxville Opera is breaking all of the rules of conventional opera production with the
April 30, 2016 performance of Puccini’s masterpiece Tosca. For the first time in history, the artists, orchestra, and audience will travel among three venues in order to simulate the character’s experiences.

You are invited to be one of only 1,400 people to participate in this once-in-a-lifetime experience. Performed in Church Street United Methodist Church, Knoxville Convention Exhibition Center, World’s Fair Park Amphitheater.

Performed in Italian.

Performance Venues for Knoxville Opera's production of Tosca
Performance Venues for Knoxville Opera’s production of Tosca

DINING BETWEEN ACTS I & II at Holiday Inn World’s Fair Park

A special Tosca Foodfest dinner is conveniently available between Act 1 and Act 2 from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. in the Holiday Inn WFP Ballroom. Ample buffet stations with delicious themed selections and Knoxville Opera entertainment – all for $50 per person. Tickets to attend this dinner must be pre-purchased and are non-refundable. Reservations can only be made by calling the Holiday Inn WFP between April 1st and 28th at 865-934-3398. The restaurant at the Holiday Inn is also available for breakfast, lunch, and dinner on April 30th. Here is a summary of the planned menu:

HOLIDAY INN WORLD’S FAIR PARK HOTEL INFORMATION

The Holiday Inn World’s Fair Park Hotel (865-934-3398) is offering a one or two-night special package which includes parking for the event and breakfast for two persons on April 29 and 30, 2016 for $139 plus tax per night. Ask for the “Tosca Guestroom.”

This promotion is limited, so please reserve your room as soon as possible.

Salads:

  • Caesar Salad
  • Field Green Salad
  • Pasta Salad
  • Greek Salad
  • Caprese Salad

Bread and Olive Station

  • Olive oils
  • Olives
  • Breads
  • Italian meats

Hot Foods

  • Chicken Parmesan
  • Vegetarian Lasagna
  • Salmon
  • Italian vegetable medley

Pasta Station

  • Meatballs with Marinara
  • Vegetarian Pasta with Olive Oil Base
  • Chicken Alfredo

Dessert Station

  • Cannoli
  • Tiramisu
  • Mousse
  • Italian Cream Layer Cake

Rome, Italy, June 17, 1800

Experience a riveting journey with Tosca’s passionate characters on June 17, 1800 in Rome. You are there to witness the shocking events of this fateful day: the murder of the police chief Scarpia, the execution of the artist Cavaradossi, and the death of opera diva Floria Tosca! Your adventure begins in the afternoon at the Church of Sant’Andrea della Valle (Church Street United Methodist Church) where, enveloped in the sound of the pipe organ, you’ll celebrate the majestic Te Deum. In the evening, after the news of Napoleon’s victory has reached Rome, you’ll join Scarpia at the Farnese Palace (Knoxville Convention Exhibition Center) where he diabolically manipulates Tosca and her lover. Then, a short walk under the stars transports you to the legendary Sant’Angelo Castle (World’s Fair Park Amphitheater) to behold Cavaradossi’s execution and Tosca’s dramatic leap from atop the Castle! Tosca seating is extremely limited. Reserve your tickets right away!

Due to unique production logistics, projected English translations ARE NOT available at this performance. A free English translation to the libretto is available for download here!

Tosca-Seating-for-web

Act I – 2pm Start

This ticket link has been taken down to prepare for our production of Tosca. Tickets are still available and can be purchased by calling our box office 865-524-0795 x1.

Act I – 3:45pm Start

This ticket link has been taken down to prepare for our production of Tosca. Tickets are still available and can be purchased by calling our box office 865-524-0795 x1.

DINING BETWEEN ACTS I & II
A special Tosca Foodfest dinner is conveniently available between Act 1 and Act 2 from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. in the Holiday Inn WFP Ballroom. Ample buffet stations with delicious themed selections and Knoxville Opera entertainment – all for $50 per person. Tickets to attend this dinner must be pre-purchased and are non-refundable. Reservations can only be made by calling the Holiday Inn WFP between April 1st and 28th at 865-934-3398. The restaurant at the Holiday Inn is also available for breakfast, lunch, and dinner on April 30th.

HOLIDAY INN WORLD’S FAIR PARK HOTEL INFORMATION
The Holiday Inn WFP (865-934-3398) is offering a one or two night special package which includes parking for the event and breakfast for two persons on April 29 and 30, 2016 for $139 plus tax per night. Ask for the “Tosca Guestroom.” This promotion is limited, so please reserve your room as soon as possible.

Meet the Cast

Kerri-Marcinko-124x150

Kerri Marcinko (Floria Tosca)

Birthplace: Cleveland, Ohio
Foreign Opera and Festival: Greek National Opera, Festival Lyrique en Mer (France)
U.S. Opera Companies: Houston Grand Opera, Los Angeles Opera, New York City Opera, Boston Lyric Opera, Nashville Opera, San Antonio Opera, Toledo Opera, Spokane Opera, Opera East Texas, Opera at Florham (NJ), Kyrenia Opera (NY), Teatro Grattacielo (NY)
U.S. Orchestras and Festivals: Richmond Symphony, Little Orchestra Society of New York, New England Symphonic Ensemble, Westfield Symphony, Helena Symphony, Missoula Symphony, Adrian Symphony, Crested Butte Music Festival (CO), Bellingham Music Festival (WA)

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Jonathan Burton (Mario Cavaradossi)

Birthplace: Portsmouth, Ohio
Foreign Opera: Royal Opera Muscat (Oman)
Foreign Orchestras: Munich Philharmonic Orchestra, Teatro la Fenice (Venice), Sinfonica de Galicia (Spain), Royal Oman Symphony Orchestra
U.S. Opera Companies: Nashville Opera, Knoxville Opera, Sarasota Opera, Kentucky Opera, Florida Grand Opera, Tulsa Opera, Utah Opera, Utah Festival Opera, Shreveport Opera, Palm Beach Opera, Phoenix Metro Opera, Opera New Jersey, Dayton Opera, Opera Omaha, Des Moines Metro Opera, Annapolis Opera, Central City Opera, Lyric Opera Virginia, Opera Naples, Opera on the James
U.S. Orchestras and Festival: Kentucky Symphony, Springfield Symphony, Lexington Symphony, Southern Ohio Symphony, Castleton Festival

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Scott Bearden (Scarpia)

Birthplace: Flint, Michigan
Foreign Opera Company: International Vocal Arts Institute (Tel Aviv)
U.S. Opera Companies: San Francisco Opera, Opera Boston, Knoxville Opera, Opera New Jersey, Toledo Opera, Mississippi Opera, Opera Theater of Connecticut, Opera Memphis, Opera San Jose, Opera Grand Rapids, Eugene Opera, Cedar Rapids Opera, West Bay Opera, Mercury Opera, Rockland Opera (NY), California Festival Opera
U.S. Orchestras : Monterey Symphony, Oakland East Bay Symphony, Midland Symphony, Symphony Silicon Valley
U.S. Festivals: Tanglewood Music Festival, Caramoor Music Festival, Sanibel Music Festival, Mendocino Music Festival

Ian-McEuen-124x150

Ian McEuen (Spoletta)

Website: ada-artists.com/artist-roster/ian-mceuen
Birthplace: Bethesda, Maryland
U.S. Opera Companies: Washington National Opera, Nashville Opera, Arizona Opera, Fort Worth Opera, Glimmerglass Festival (NY), Aspen Opera
U.S. Orchestras: Chicago Bar Association Symphony Orchestra, New York City Chamber Orchestra

Geoffrey-Hoos-124x150

Geoffrey Hoos (Sacristan/Sciarrone/Jailer)

Birthplace: Marlton, New Jersey
U.S. Opera Companies: Sarasota Opera, Opera Libera (PA), Musica Raritana (NJ), Opera at Rutgers (NJ),St. Joseph’s University Opera (PA)
U.S. Orchestras and Festivals: Bard Summerscapes Music Festival (NY), The Lyric Orchestra (FL), Saint Joseph’s University Orchestra (PA), Rutgers Symphony Orchestra (NJ)

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Peter Johnson (Angelotti)

Birthplace: Saint James, Minnesota
U.S. Opera Companies: Nashville Opera, Knoxville Opera, Des Moines Metro Opera, Opera on the James, Fargo-Moorhead Opera, University of Tennessee Opera Theatre
U.S. Orchestra and Festivals: Concordia College Orchestra (MN), Brevard Music Center (NC), Pine Mountain Music Festival (MI)

Plot Synopsis

Due to unique production logistics, projected English translations ARE NOT available at this performance. A free English translation to the libretto is available for download here!

Act I: The Church of Sant’Andrea della Valle

Angelotti, an escaped political prisoner, takes refuge in a side chapel of the church of Sant’Andrea della Valle in Rome. An elderly sacristan comes to tidy up, followed by Cavaradossi, a painter, who is at work on a portrait of the Madonna. Cavaradossi compares his Madonna’s blonde-haired, blue-eyed charm with the dark beauty of his lover, the famous singer Floria Tosca (“Recondita armonia”).

Angelotti emerges from hiding to find Cavaradossi, his political ally, who promises to help his friend escape from Rome. Angelotti hides again at the sound of Tosca’s voice from outside. Tosca jealously demands to know why the door was locked. Cavaradossi reassures her, and they join in a passionate duet (“Non la sospiri”).

Once Tosca has gone, Angelotti reappears and he and Cavaradossi plan his flight. A cannon shot from the Castel Sant’Angelo announces the discovery of Angelotti’s escape. They exit. The sacristan enters followed by clerics and choir boys, all excited by rumors of Bonaparte’s defeat (“Tutta qui la cantoria”). Baron Scarpia, the chief of police, arrives with his henchman Spoletta in search of the escaped prisoner.
Tosca returns, and Scarpia plays upon Tosca’s jealousy in hopes of discovering Angelotti’s whereabouts (“Tosca divina”). When she leaves to seek her lover, Scarpia has her followed. As the crowd intones the “Te Deum,” Scarpia vows to bring Cavaradossi to the gallows and Tosca into his arms (“Va, Tosca! Nel tuo cuor s’annida Scarpia”).

Act II: Scarpia’s study in the Palazzo Farnese; that evening.

Alone at dinner, Scarpia reviews his plot. Spoletta reports that he and his men trailed Tosca to the villa and found no trace of Angelotti, but placed Cavaradossi under arrest. Cavaradossi is brought in and questioned.

Scarpia has sent for Tosca, and she enters as Cavaradossi is taken away to be tortured. Upon hearing his anguished cries, Tosca reveals Angelotti’s hiding place. Cavaradossi is dragged into the study. His anger at Tosca’s betrayal turns to joy when Sciarrone announces that Bonaparte has actually defeated Melas at Marengo. The enraged Scarpia sends Cavaradossi back to his cell.

Tosca asks the price of her lover’s freedom. Scarpia will accept only Tosca’s submission. “Vissi d’arte” (“I have lived for art”), Tosca sobs to herself in a celebrated aria: she has devoted her life to music and piety, why does God repay her with misery? As she struggles to free herself from Scarpia’s embrace, Spoletta enters with the news that Angelotti has killed himself rather than be arrested. Ashamed, Tosca signals that she will give in to the Baron, on condition that Cavaradossi be set free at once. Scarpia explains that he cannot grant a pardon; he can only release Cavaradossi by faking his death in a mock execution. Tosca demands that Scarpia provide a note of safe conduct for herself and Cavaradossi. While he is writing, Tosca catches sight of a sharp knife on his dinner table and, unnoticed, takes it. Scarpia seals the note, then turns eagerly to embrace the trembling diva. “Questo è il bacio di Tosca!” (“This is Tosca’s kiss!”), she cries, plunging the knife deep into his heart. Scarpia cries out for help as Tosca curses him. She takes the safe-conduct pass and slips out of the room.

Act III: The Castel Sant’Angelo; dawn of the following day.

Soldiers bring Cavaradossi to the ramparts of the fortress. He reflects on his love for Tosca (“E lucevan le stelle”).  Tosca rushes in with the note of safe conduct and the story of Scarpia’s violent death. Cavaradossi praises her courage, saying that her gentle hands were not meant for murder (“O dolci mani”). Tosca instructs him in the plan of the feigned execution: after the gunshots he is to lie still until she gives him a signal. Though she believes the execution to be a farce, Tosca is filled with anxiety as her lover is led before the soldiers. They fire and Cavaradossi falls to the ground. Tosca whispers to him to remain motionless until everyone has gone. At last she tells him it is safe, but he does not respond. With a piercing scream, Tosca realizes Scarpia’s final deceit. She weeps over Cavaradossi’s body as Spoletta and Sciarrone, having found the Baron murdered, burst in to arrest her. Too quick for them, she runs to a parapet, shouts “O Scarpia, avanti a Dio!” (“Oh Scarpia, we shall meet before God!”), and hurls herself to her death.